Best way to graze paddocks?

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Best way to graze paddocks?

cletus's picture
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Joined: 14/09/2016

G'day. Im new to the forum and have not long ago brought a 5 acre property in Wamuran. There is a 2.5 acre paddock with a dam and a 1/2 acre paddock. There is mainly paspalum, kikuyu, Pangola and a few other grasses. I have 3 dorper ewes and 2 horses.  The sheep are in the smaller paddock at the moment but I have noticed that they eat some patches of grass almost to the dirt and there are other patches that are still long. What would be the best way to graze the stock on the pasture to try and keep the grasses healthy and at a decent height? Any help would be appreciated, cheers.

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MalFarmStyle's picture
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Joined: 02/06/2016

Rotating grazing pastures mainly according to their growth stages will improve their quality and dry matter production.

It is important to be able to put grazing pressure on and off at the right stages and to do this you need well planned infrastructure, namely paddocks (fences) and water. A Whole Farm Plan (WFP) is recommended.

In my opinion, horses are not easy to manage for a pasture grazing rotation. You need a holding paddock for the horses to be kept off the pasture during regrowth stages and you can’t leave them on lush pastures (grazing stage) for horse health reasons.

 

Horses and sheep will have a preference for short young growth and leave the older, rank pasture. Cattle will graze the rank pasture better but will still go for the young growth…this is why you rotate your paddocks to allow the new growth to get atleast 10cm (varies with species etc).

 

Slashing the paddocks can help remove rank feed and promote new growth.

Once your grazing system is working well, you’ll find that there will be very little rank feed.

 

Other things come into the mix for example: soil, pasture species, fertilizer etc, so suggest:

Learn how grass grows.

Learn to optimise utilization of the grass.

 

Get the basics right and fine tune with experience and knowledge collection.

This link should help.

http://www.makingmorefromsheep.com.au/grow-more-pasture/index.htm

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